Category Archives: training

New Almaden Trail Race (Quicksilver Park)

While we’re less than half a mile to the coast here in Monterey, we happen to be spoiled by the West Coast’s tectonic genius and are also a short drive away from state parks, mountain ranges and endless trails for exploring.

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He did some searching and quickly found us a local trail race – New Almaden Race at Quicksilver Park. We had a few weeks to adjust to the microclimates here – if it’s 65* in Monterey assume that it’s at least 80* in San Jose? Got it! – and prepare our muscles for the changing terrain. He contemplated signing up for the half-marathon option, until we looked up race times from last year and the winner of the 10k came in around 1:35.

Uh….’scuse me?

The course is described as “hard with steep up and down hills”, oh, “ and is all exposed”. NOTED. We’ll start ‘small’ here in Cali. I figured the new Mizuno Hayates could handle all of the above – their first race-test. (We convinced Rachel to join us for her first trail race, too!)

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It started early, at 7am, to keep the half + full marathons in cool temps for a little while. Six hundred feet of climbing in the first mile (slowest split of the day, rolling in at 13:42) will wake you up faster than any cup o’ joe! I started to do some math and assumed I’d be lucky to finish in 1:20, and decided to stick with that.

Mile 2 brought some reprieve-turned-quad-pounding with 400 ft of descent, offering little comfort on an out-and-back course. But at least this split resembled something similar to “running”, with a much faster 10:22. WHEW.

I didn’t see any runners on their way back until around mile 2.8, and started seriously wondering if I had somehow screwed up a very well-marked course. Luckily the leaders came up around the corner (hey, I know you!), followed by the only other person I saw before the half-way point aid station. Hm, I’m in fourth place….*

I stopped for a cup of water and friendly chit-chat with the volunteers at the aid station (mile 3.1) – I know with trail races they often have to check your number & make sure you’re still out there and moving. Starting up and out again, I learned the two runners closest to me were at least a quarter-mile back. New goal: keep it that way!

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The actual goal was to run as much as I physically could. The ‘rule’ was that if I didn’t have to lean forward to get up a climb, I had to try to run. Sometimes walking was actually more efficient, but it’s easy to keep walking even once you’re over the crest because this is tough. The faster you get your legs ‘running’, once they can, the easier it is to motivate them to keep moving.

Almaden Run Altitude

One hill I actually walked up backwards, in an attempt to save the calves and lower back some agony. One hill was so steep I walked down it, too.

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There was one different turn on the way back that would save us a few ups and downs, easing up on the quads and hamstrings just a little bit.  He was waiting at the 6-mile ‘mark’ (miles weren’t marked), ready to hop in and push me to the finish. You know, that annoying thing where a pacer runs just a few steps ahead of you when you’re exhausted and so close and like, REALLY dude?! , but you chase them anyway.

The Finish Line sprint was hardly that, but it felt good to go ‘fast’ on a relatively flat section and see that huge jug of cold water waiting for us!

New Almaden Quicksilver Park 10K

1:08:58
6.2 miles
Top Female Finisher
(
Small Race = Big rewards)

Huge thanks to the West Coast Trail Running Group for an excellent race, course & finisher’s food spread! We can’t wait to join you guys again soon!

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{MCM} Endurance Training Tales: Different Long Run Options

For the first time in a long time (possibly, ever?), I put on my big-girl marathon pants and started the training process nice n’ early. MCM announced the 16-weeks mark and I could be like “ON IT!” instead of Psh.

You could say I’ve had a change-of-heart.

stubborn goals

Training never really ceased or ‘started’ after Charlottesville – it was a seamless transition from recovery to 10k-race to right-back-at-it! The Coach hasn’t given up on me, and my heart is slowly coming back to bat after throwing the moving-stress-tantrum for a few weeks.  Because Charlottesville training was so different for me, I didn’t feel the intense need to take a ton of time off, or break-up with the marathon forever (just the hilly ones, maybe). Rather, I threw my hat in the MCM lottery because hot-damn I love that race with all my heart, and fate played spades. I’m in!

We’re doing this, MCM – round 3.

This year has been all about putting my ego to rest and letting a Coach tell me what to do, how to do it, and why to stop freaking out about my slow, easy, pace. It’s been about trying a new approach to endurance training, letting someone else take the reigns. I’ve become best friends with TrainingPeaks.com, my Polar watch (RC3 GPS/HRM) and MAF training.

My weekly training schedules of yore bare little-to-no resemblance to what my calendar fills up with these days. Exhibit A: the Long Run.

What I used to do: set out to tackle an exact mileage, increasing by ~2 miles each week, taking every third week “off” (step-back). 14, 16, 18, 20 – milers. The drill.

What I do now: leave the calculating and brain-waves and mad-scientist action to the Coach, of course! My Long Runs are almost always based on time, not miles, and are typically broken down into very specific sections.

I love this for a few reasons: it’s not monotonous, it gives my brain something to think about as I chug along, it challenges me in a different way, and on that note, it’s DIFFERENT. Some days I run solely based on heart-rate ranges (a), some days there are times + pace sections (b), some days it’s based on mileage and pace sections (c) and some days I look at my schedule, scratch my head and spend 5 minutes memorizing the flavor of the day.

Say what? Lemme explain…

(a) 2:00 hours: 30 min warm-up, 60 min at MAF*, 15 min MAF + 5, 15 min cool-down.

(b) 2:00 hours: 30 min warm-up, 45 min at MAF, 30 min at 5K Pace (RPE*), 15 min cool-down.

(c) 15 miles: 2-mile warm-up, 2 miles at 9:00 min/mile, 8 miles at 8:00 min/mile, 3 mile cool-down.

Disclaimer: warm-ups, cool-downs, MAF, paces, etc. are all unique to you. These are just random examples!

*Team TAD trains by the MAF method. I hate-love it.

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If you’re feeling stagnant and ready for something new, don’t be afraid to go back to the drawing board. There is always something to learn about yourself, your abilities, your comfort zone boundaries and the sport, itself. Changing the Long Run is something most endurance runners are hesitant to do – it’s THE gold standard of endurance running – but trust me, it has more to offer to you.

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{Marathon} Training Tales: Joy is…

“Joy is what happens to us when we allow ourselves to recognize how good things really are.”        Marianne Williamson

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Marathon week has swiftly arrived!

This cycle went quickly since it started in late January and left me with about 10 weeks to figure out this whole HR-based, MAF, aerobic training stuff. I’ve dissected more runs and heart-rates and science-y things than all four previous training cycles combined! At one point there was a LOT of information swirling around in my brain.

Now, it’s just time to let it work. To let it go and see what happens. It’s time to remember that I trained for the process, not the medal (not even sure if we get one of those?). I trained this way to try a new approach with a fresh perspective, for the lifestyle that accompanies the choice to attempt a(nother) marathon. To ask some questions, and move in a different direction (or at different speeds, with different HRs n’ such!).

To grab that joy of running…

simple rules

Joy is…going to the track and doing those very specific workouts.

On the track, I feel more dedicated than anywhere else. You have to seek out this exact location and get here to do this exact, specific, run. I’ve never been much of a “track” runner before – for those exact reasons, having to do something so specific and prescribed and boring  – so it stands out to me.

This cycle involved a  few trips to the track for MAF tests, and one final visit yesterday for some pace testing. I got one last lap (400m) to “unload”! And with that, I ran to toe the line of all-out and you-still-have-a-race-to-run and to turn corners with a stupid-silly grin because whoa, this cycle was a good one.

Joy is…the little rush of looking up your schedule for the week.

I put this entirely in someone else’s hands. The only specific requests I had were: “I’d prefer not to train by HR only” and “I like to do long runs on Saturday”.  So, I got half of what I wanted! But some prayers are best left unanswered; if you want different results and experiences, you have to DO something different.

There were no two weeks alike; every time I logged onto Training Peaks with anticipation – what’s next? What do I get to do this week??? The first time I saw “the big mama” I spent the rest of the week excited for Saturday’s adventure.

( If first-marathon-me (circa 2010) read that paragraph
there would be eye-rolling for days. )

Joy is…asking questions, learning about a sport you love.

Joy is…visualizing that Finish Line clock & banner.

Joy is…realizing you’ve stepped so far forward you’re suddenly in Race Week.

With this week comes the good kind of nervous, slowly seeping into the muscle fibers. I wrote to my coach that it’ll come on strong tomorrow (Thursday) and Friday; the anxious-excited that starts to slowly drip adrenaline into my system every single time I think about the starting line, mile 15, or 21 or 25 or 26.1 and THE finish line sight. The running, all over.

It’s the type of nervous that gets you to that mental place you need to be – just enough fear, because it will hurt – without totally derailing the physical+mental readiness. That feeds your legs all of the juice they’ll need to push past their perceived limits. And that flashes your goal time across that mental clock over and over AND OVER, until you just know you’ll chase it no matter what.

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Joy is chasing a goal.

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Training Tales: Recovery Running

Today checked the third run-box in as many days, defying any logic my previous training approach would have justified. In another life, I would have been behind the steering wheel with directions reading “Caution: Detour! Turn right, rest after the Long Run (LR)!”

A recovery run? Wellll, that’s the short-cut to injury! So much running!
Take it easy!

Flash forward: barring the 24-hr flu/food-poisoning mongrel that wreaked havoc last weekend, I’ve run for 30-60+ minutes after every LR for the past 6 weeks. Lo and behold, all systems are still functioning.

Not only does my schedule include a weekly recovery run, it tacks onto the fatigue with “1 hour, easy” every Monday. I’ve come to appreciate, and actually look forward to, these routine runs so much so that there was no skipping it today. Snow day? Forecast of 5-10”? Better get out there early, before it piles up!

snow run.3.3.14

Mission accomplished.

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FIRST order of business: I had to run the LR differently.
Because the coach (and oh so many running experts) says so!. 

The LR should be done at an easy effort and ‘conversational pace’; slowing the ‘normal’ run pace by 30-60 seconds  doesn’t always add up. We have some intuition assessing how a run may ‘feel’, but that’s (more often than not) clouded by expectations and ego. It’s easily ignored when X + Y doesn’t equal Z  in our mental math.

Enter: the HRM. That thing doesn’t lie! It tells you exactly how your body perceives effort, in real time. On some days it’s your friend, while others it is your ego-smashing foe. Either way, you have the harsh truth right there on the screen.

Every LR has come with very very specific instructions. Pace and mileage don’t make appearances; I look only at “HR” and “Time”.

just goSource: Greatist.com

SECOND, I had to be inquisitive.
Because I’m a questioner and I need logic behind these things!

While the LR should be taxing and working to increase endurance, it should not slam on your brakes. It should not leave your legs so completely trashed that you can’t fathom the idea of running the next day. (That’s what a race-effort is saved for!)

Consider my former self’s mind blown.

When you take the LR easy (as defined by your perceived effort and/or HR zones – pick your flavor), your aerobic system gets a good looong workout. And when you’re training for a marathon, the aerobic system is your very best friend. Work it, work it!

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Some perspective: a 400m sprint is run 99% anaerobically. GO GO GO – breathe if you find time!  A marathon is run 99% aerobically. Oxygen is along for the ride

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If you can save just a little bit of energy and effort for the day-after a LR, you can go at it again. You can run on tired, but not trashed, legs and increase your resistance to fatigue (e.g. the Hanson Method). You can have a little chat with those muscles and be like “Hey, remember what it feels like to reach mile 23 and convince yourself to keep going despite every single part of you screaming to PLEASE STOP?”… “We’re training for that moment, right now.”

And this may be a game-changer. I still have 5 weeks to train, check boxes, refuel and recover. But I can tell you that in many ways my mentality has shifted; a recovery run may be your Ace if you play the cards right*.

*This assumes a runner who has no previous injury that prevents running consecutive days in a row. Above all, do what works for you.

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Do you include recovery runs in your training? Why / why not?

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Learning to Love…

The past month has been a lesson in practicing discipline, being patient and embracing an entirely new approach. I’ve gone through a tough breakup*, one we can all relate to. You’re stuck obsessing over the little things, knowing full well when you’re making deposits in the ego-bank (that acquire little-to-no interest) instead of investing in your own long-term success.

You’re ready to move on, but sometimes need a little outside push.

Things only get “better” by change. Embrace change; invite it over for appetizers and get to know it as slowly as you feel comfortable with, and then you’ll find you have a lot in common and could probably chat for hours and you might even ask change to stick around for dessert. After all, you never know what could be…so, why not?

just goIn the spirit of this lover’s holiday, I’m not here to drone on about the lows and the tough days and the little tantrums that our minds sometimes slip through the crack. Nope – those won’t do any good! Today, we’re chatting about the growth that comes when you declare victory over all of the above.

Since we last spoke, I decided against fighting the HR and thus I win. It’s a pretty sweet deal. We’re very happy together.

run walk

Or at least up the hills, and if I’m chatting your ear off, and if the paper-man throws a newspaper right near me during a dark early-morning jaunt in the neighborhood. I’m learning a lot of lessons about what makes the heart skip a beat!

The back-story: when I started this HR-based training cycle, it was recommended I remove pace (and perhaps distance) from my watch. Yes I could still do the nerdy run thing and calculate them myself, but focusing on one number (HR) while running is enough. Trying to match that up with expectations and associations won’t be any good – comparing your current beau with all of the exes is never advantageous, right? Right.

too far

I’d prefer to only go 26.2 miles, but you get the gist.

*So, I broke up with pace. And that is NO easy feat for a runner. But, in the early stages, while I’m base-building and courting my own cardiovascular system (so romantic), it doesn’t serve me. It’s a mind-game gone sour, and when it’s not in the mix, you’re suddenly very relaxed.

This time, running is about effort and efficiency – working to strengthen your cardio and aerobic system. Once you have the basics down, you work on pace and mindset and race-day plans.

The greenest thing on this side of the fence is how you can gauge improvement. With mileage/pace-focused training, I can add 2 miles to every long run every Saturday and survive that, feeling as though I’m moving forward. But, there’s no way to know for sure – some long runs are great, and despite every effort, some feel really freaking awful. While that may still be the case here, I can look back at the trend. And when things are going well? It’s very obvious! When you  can say “I ran for one hour (again) and covered more distance at a faster pace and lower average heart-rate than last week!”, you can also say “Whoop! It’s working!!!”. The latter is less of a mouthful, but if you’ve ever trained by HR, you know the former is really what we’re going for.

I’m learning to love the math, data, HRM and pace-free watch screen. I’m learning to trust a new process. I’m learning how great it can feel to “run easy”, with plenty of oxygen. I’m learning that there is always more to learn.

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What have you learned to love lately?

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